Minnesota Public Golf Association




Minnesota Public Golf Association
PACE OF PLAY POLICY

The MPGA Pace of Play is a "checkpoint" policy based on players reaching a specific point on the course by the time established by the Committee. It replaces the policy of timing players who were out-of-position and had been warned. The concept is simple: maintain your position on the golf course. It places the responsibility for maintaining the pace where it belongs - with you, the player.

The goal of the MPGA Pace of Play Policy is to ensure that a reasonable pace of play is maintained by the whole field, not to force an unreasonable pace of play. Scorecards will have the time your group is expected to complete each hole.

If you fall behind, you are expected to play efficient golf and get back into position. This might mean playing ready golf or continuous putting (both are permitted in stroke play). If available, atomic clocks will be stationed behind the putting greens on holes #5 and 14. Then, if available, clocks will be placed on the teeing grounds of holes #9 and 18 giving you the opportunity to check on your pace throughout the course.

CHECKPOINTS: 9th and 18th Greens
There will be an MPGA official present on your 9th and 18th holes to record your pace. The hole is considered complete when the flagstick is returned to the hole. You will be shown a GREEN card if your group is within your allotted time; a YELLOW card if you are behind your allotted time but within 14 minutes of the preceding group; a RED card if you are OUT OF POSITION (behind your allotted time and more than 14 minutes behind the preceding group). If you are OUT OF POSITION after finishing the 9th or 18th hole everyone in the group will be assessed a pace of play penalty. Pace of play penalties are to be added to the score on the 9th or 18th hole. No warnings are issued with this policy (RED card = automatic penalty). (NOTE: See below for the Appeals Process.)

OUT OF POSITION:
First Group Only: If the lead group is behind its expected time after completing one checkpoint (9th or 18th hole) players will be shown a RED card and each player in the group shall add a ONE-STROKE PENALTY to his score for that hole. If they pass the second checkpoint behind their expected time, another RED card will be shown and each player shall add an additional TWO-STROKE PENALTY to his score for that hole. In the event of a double tee start, if they pass the second check point behind their expected time AND more than 14 minutes behind the last group off the opposite starting hole, another RED card will be shown and each player must add an additional TWO-STROKE PENALTY to his score for that hole. A group may appeal the penalty in the scoring area before returning their scorecards.

Subsequent Groups:
If any subsequent group passes one checkpoint (9th or 18th hole) behind its expected time AND more than 14 minutes behind the preceding group, players will be shown a RED card and each player in the group shall add a ONE-STROKE PENALTY to his score for that hole. If they pass the second checkpoint behind their expected time AND more than 14 minutes behind the preceding group, another RED card will be shown and each player shall add an additional TWO-STROKE PENALTY to his score for that hole. A group may appeal the penalty in the scoring area before returning their scorecards.

A player concerned about a slow player(s) in his group should first speak with the player(s) and encourage them to play more efficiently. Then, the concerned player may, before or after penalties are assessed, ask to have the group monitored. The individual player does not have to be identified; the request just needs to be made. At some point during the stipulated round, the group will be monitored. If a player is identified as holding up the pace of the group, penalties may be applied to that player and rescinded from the others. This is the point where players should step up and identify the slow player.

APPEAL PROCESS
Pace of Play penalties may be appealed to the Committee and must be made before scorecards are signed and returned. In order for an appeal to be considered, there must have been an action by the Committee, a circumstance beyond the players' control, or some similar occurrence that contributed to the delay, such as an action by an individual member of the group. If a group receives a penalty for exceeding the pace of play for each nine, both penalties may be appealed, however, each appeal must be made and handled separately. Each appeal may result in a one step reduction of a penalty (i.e., three strokes to one stroke then one stroke to no penalty, but not three strokes to no penalty).